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smart spending reforms to the pentagon, which we all know is the largest federal agency and loses billions of dollars every year through waste, fraud and abuse. many of my colleagues recognize that no serious plan to address the deficit can go forward without significant pentagon cuts on the table. it targets $278 billion in wasteful pentagon spending and re-invests those dollars in our teachers, our rhodes and our future. -- roads and our future. these cuts will undermine our national security. only the wasteful, excessive and bloated spending is targeted. i'm especially pleased to see that this bill includes enforcement language that will audit the pentagon. these measures would increase transparency and accountability with the pentagon budget and get us on a fair and balanced road to fiscal sustainability. oftentimes, my colleagues don't really realize that the pentagon has not been audited and cannot be audited and we need an audit and we are calling for an audit of the pentagon. i'm going to re-introduce my bipartisan bill as a separate stand-alone effort to keep wasteful spe
with a balanced approach to new revenue and necessary pentagon cuts and it creates jobs all over the country. it equalizes the cuts we've already made with revenue by closing tax loopholes for america's wealthiest individuals and corporations. but we shouldn't just sacrifice our economic recovery because republicans are unwilling to vote for one single penny and new revenue, new contributions from their billionaire friends and corporations. we have to look at what these cuts mean in the sequester. the sequester involves 70,000 children being kicked off of head start. no one in this chamber disagrees about the importance of head start. early childhood education is absolutely essential in creating the foundation for learning in children all over the world. and that's what head start is about. 70,000 american children being kicked off head start. that's what happens when you use a meat cleaver instead of a scalpel. we're talking about more than a million kids who will see their schools lose education funding. we're talking about emergency responders who will lose their jobs, meaning slower resp
cuts scheduled to take effect march 1. half the cuts are from the pentagon. we will discuss that with ray locker. and a conversation about the use of lethal force against suspected terrorists. then we will talk about the 22 anniversary of the family and medical leave act. washington journal, live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. tonight, former president bill clinton speaks to a gathering of house democrats. new secretary of state john kerry meets with the canadian foreign minister. then a military farewell for leon panetta. senator ben cardin talks to employees at the national institutes of health. >> first lady helen taft on discussing politics. >> i had always had the satisfaction of knowing almost as much he about the politics and intricacies of any situation. i think any woman can discuss with her husband topics of national interest. i became familiar with more than politics. >> helen taft, whose husband, william howard taft, was the only man to serve as president and supreme court justice. c-span is new original series, first ladies, image and influence. produced with t
from georgetown, serve as my chief of staff at the c.i.a. and then followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who's had a public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the c.i.a. and the pentagon, and i am deeply grateful for their work for me and on behalf of the nation and i am deeply grateful for georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel, and i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate they need as the nation emerges from more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another jesuit institution, santa clara uni
return home, and i admit that when we first asked him to lead the pentagon, his answer was simple -- no. but i kept asking him. i am persistent. that is how michelle married me. i just kept at it, and it is a testament to his patriotism, to his sense of duty, that leon agreed to serve on this one last tour. perhaps it was the memory of his parents and opening their homes up to gi's added to the pacific, perhaps leon served himself, a young lieutenant in the army. perhaps it was the experience of watching his youngest son deployed to afghanistan. what we do know is this -- as our nation's's 23rd secretary of defense and every action beyond panetta has taken, every decision he has made has been with one goal in mind -- taking care of our sons and our daughters in uniform and keeping america safe. just think of the progress under his watch. because we ended the war in iraq, winding down the war in afghanistan, our troops are coming home, and next year our war in afghanistan will come to an end. we have put the core of al qaeda on the path to defeat. we have been relentless against its affi
is stepping down from his pentagon post. that is at 9:30 eastern. on c-span 3, funding for technology research and development, live from the house committee at 9:30 eastern. some of the automatic spending cuts delayed by congress in december are scheduled to take effect next month. in 45 minutes,
that there is any role for the government beyond providing for defense and funding the pentagon. that is the view of some. it is not the view of the great majority of the american people. i think the president will propose -- nobody knows what the president will say -- i think he will propose lots of ideas about how we can support them -- to spur innovation in this country. the government has had an important role in basic research. i mentioned the national institutes of health. you have other agencies, in the energy sector or other sectors, that can help provide seed money for those sorts of things. host: the ranking democrat on the house budget committee, representative chris van hollen, our guest on a newsmakers. the "usa today" put it in one word, jobs. this is available online at usatoday.com. a point from joseph ramirez -- from inside "the new york times ," there is this -- a couple of other details from this piece -- from the body of this story -- two other points, first on the issue of immigration, the president will say that he intends to make good on his promised to revamp the nation's
. >> we are under 10 days now. the pentagon briefed yesterday saying the furloughs among civilian employees would not take place until late april. >> i think the process begins, an administrative process for you and not something that will begin and notices began to go out but i would refer you to the pentagon for details. >> you have to cut into other things. >> each agency is dealing with the serious implications of the sequester to their budgets. the defense is one of those agencies that will be hit very hard but i refer you to the agencies themselves about how they are managing the process. >> the president got good news because rick scott said he now wants to expand medicaid. he is one of several -- several republican governors who have looked flopped on that. how does the white house review that? >> we are focused on implementation of the portable care act. we think the decisions made by governors across the country to move forward with implementation recognize that the benefits here for providing affordable health care to citizens of their state are very worthwhile. and we
of the marriage act. the pentagon has temporarily grounded a powerful fleet of fire jets over a discovered crack in the engine blades. six tanks at a nuclear site holding radioactive waste are leaking. the do not pose an immediate threat to public safety. good morning, it is "the washington journal." our first 45 minutes this morning, we are going to ask you about paid sick leave. lawmakers in six states are trying to make paid six time -- paid sick time our requirement. 25% of par to employees to not get paid sick days. we are asking you, should paid sick days be a federal mandate? if you want to reach out was on social media, you can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at urnal@cspan.org legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and
there is a lot of innovation that started on the defense side. as you see, the restraint on the pentagon plus those that will come into play, do you think that has negative impacts on the competitive manufacturing. >> i do not know enough about it. we are not a big player in that space anymore. i think a little bit of a catalyst is something that you see in every corner of the world. i do not go to one place where there is no government at all. there is a little bit of a role. the private sector is very strong and innovative and we should be happy about the unfair premier real spirit. the private sector can pick up a lot depending on how the government is restructured. there will be such a value in getting some of these things behind us so we can adjust and get forward. the sigh of relief and -- i think is so important right now. >> just so it does not end with a discussion on washington. we can compete. i want everybody to know we can compete. there are markets to be had. the workforce when directed and trained is as good as any in the world. please know that. >> thank you very optimistic no
to "usa today," which in the cover story lay out some specific areas. the pentagon said a majority of civilian employees will be furloughed. they talked about agricultural department, with meat and poultry inspectors facing furloughs. this information goes on and on , no matter where you read today. june is calling from wisconsin. independent. caller: hi. i just want everybody to remember that we sent the people to washington who are our "representatives" to represent us, not their own egos. they should be furloughed. everybody in congress who is against doing things to make this country grow, they should not get paid. they should be laid off and not get a pay raise for years. they are always big on cutting public workers. listen, it has always been about good government jobs. government workers spend the money, and other businesses hire more people. the republicans know that, and it is just a shame that we are at war and the things we are doing in congress are, like, treasonous to me, because it is bringing down our country. my senator, ron johnson, he needs to fully explain why h
and commented on the pentagon lifting of the ban on women in the front lines of combat. one of the speakers was the first female pilot to fly in combat. here's a little of what she had to say. >> sitting in a squatter officer school, i was getting ready to go to fighter training, i just completed the triathlon, a bunch of injured 3, special forces, i take to their -- kicked their butts, and you had guys saying, "women don't have the endurance to do, admissions." you want to go outside and talk about this? [laughter] let's go for a run. the difficulty and the reason -- and seeing it even in the debates that are going on even though the train has left the station, a lot of people who are against this thing get away with you have been excluded from doing this, you have not done it, i have done it, therefore you cannot do it. i don't know if you have seen the nuances on tv lately. sure, you have been in combat and engaged with the enemy anbut that is the different from sustained operations. that is the language you are hearing, on fox, and it might. [laughter] -- fox, anyway. [laughter] justin
: from the washington times, "the biggest losers." "the pentagon estimates the states will lose a total of $ 4.8 billion in workers salaries when its civilian employees are laid off or forced to take unpaid time off because of budget constraints. california, $62,500. maryland, $45,700. this is the lost of wages -- the loss of wages for each of those states. california, $419 million, etc. sandra, good morning, you are on "washington journal." caller caller: good morning. we all had better go out and billson there's -- and build some bears. we are not getting anything to help us in any way. but on top of that, we should all have girlfriends on the side, and washington is going to hell in a handbasket. when are they going to grow up and be men and women, decent human beings, and do something right for this world? shame on you. host: do you think washington is any different now than it has been in the past? caller: i think we are wide open to what they are doing. this has evidently gone on for a long time and they can get away with anything they want. why? they can't. we can't. can you? you
for the director of intelligence or the defense intelligence agency? and that is part of the pentagon? caller: the defense intelligence agency, we are under the dod. host: what are you hearing about your job? caller: because i am a civilian, i'm liable to be placed on furlough at least one day a week, potentially 22 days until the end of the fiscal year. unfortunately, paying my half of the rent with a roommate at $1,200 a month prior to facilities, i'm going to have many difficulties with living with another analyst, just trying to afford our rent, as well as part of any food or any other expenses. host: could you have taken a job in the private sector and made more? caller: absolutely. i got a college degree try to join the intelligence agency, because i intended to serve this country. i do not wear a uniform, but i go to work every day for the defense of this nation. host: steve, from maryland, part of the energy department. caller: i am a fairly senior person. i understand the plight of folks at lower levels. the point is i have been working for the federal government for about 32 years.
and democrats face a march 1 deadline to avoid billions in across-the-board spending cuts. the pentagon announced it will offer benefits to same-sex couples. in the senate is wrapping up work on the violence against women act. and the house will vote on a bill requiring the president to offer a plan to balance the federal budget in 10 years. good morning. we begin with your take on the leaked white paper from the white house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overs
accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been warning about these sooner? >> first, we started the slowdown in spending on january 10. a number of the measures that i mentioned went into effect shortly after that. significant efforts were made to slow down spending on more draconian actions later. i know that people felt we should have said more earlier. 15 months ago the secretary sent a letter to the u.s. congress saying that the effects of sequestration would be devastating. after that we testified in august and again in september, we listed every single major item we're talking about. we said that there would be cutbacks in readiness and a unit buys would go down with unit costs growing up. what we did not do was detailed budget planning. i do not regret that. if we did it 60 months ago, we would have been wrong. we would not know that congress would have changed the size and the date and we would not have incurred the tigre -- we would not have incurred the degradation route. we sounded the alarm in every way that we could. >> what kind of contract are you having with the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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